Archive for the ‘Throwback Thursday #TBT’ Category

TBT (a day late): Happy Birthday Nick Miller!

Friday, October 31st, 2014

by Mary Ellen Eagan

Nick Miller

Nick Miller, ca 1983

We celebrate a milestone birthday for Nick Miller today, so I thought it would be fun to share a very old photo, which I’m told was taken on one of HMMH’s first field data collection trips.  This may – or may not – have been the time they rented a sailboat instead of staying in hotels; life was different in those pre-email/internet/cellphone days.  Yes, that is a book under his arm (remember those, kids?)

It has been my great pleasure to work with Nick for 30 years – even after all this time, I’m always amazed that he can distill a challenging problem to its essential element in a matter of minutes, direct a team toward a creative solution, and keep clients happy all the while.

Happy Birthday Nick!

TBT: Grand Canyon Noise Measurements, September 1999

Thursday, July 24th, 2014

by Mary Ellen Eagan

How about a four day, all-expense paid camping trip in the Grand Canyon?  All our eight teams of four people each had to do was listen for aircraft eight hours a day.  The goal was to determine which noise model best predicted tour aircraft audibility.  Thanks to Rick Ernenwein and the late Wes Henry for making it all possible.  What a team!

Grand Canyon, September 1999

Grand Canyon, September 1999

Jason Ross setting up equipment

Jason Ross setting up equipment

Nick Miller making observations

Nick Miller making observations

TBT: Noise Measurements at Idlewild

Thursday, July 17th, 2014

by Mary Ellen Eagan

I’ve been spending a lot of time the last few weeks thinking about evolution of noise issues at the Port Authority (of New York and New Jersey), and thought some of you might also appreciate these photos of early efforts to measure noise levels at JFK (then-Idlewild).

Group in New York discussing noise measurements of the British Comet 4 jet aircraft, August 1958.  Laymon Miller (Bob Miller’s dad) is seated at the far left; Beranek wears glasses.  John Wiley and Austin Tobin are standing second and third from the left, respectively.  The others are representatives from British Airways and the Port of New York Authority.

Group in New York discussing noise measurements of the British Comet 4 jet aircraft, August 1958. Laymon Miller (Bob Miller’s dad) is seated at the far left; Beranek wears glasses. John Wiley and Austin Tobin are standing second and third from the left, respectively. The others are representatives from British Airways and the Port of New York Authority.

TBT: Happy Father’s Day!

Thursday, June 12th, 2014

by Mary Ellen Eagan

I’m pretty passionate about women in the workplace, the glass ceiling, work-life balance, and all that. This week, though, I’d like to give a shout out to all the HMMH Dads out there, who often don’t get enough credit for all the juggling they do as well. In fact, my best hope for a more balanced workplace in the future is that this generation of parents is truly co-parenting – dads are taking family leave, dealing with day care and all the other appointments that come along with small kids, etc. It can only be good news for us – and our kids!

Rosalie, 2006 [Dad Brad]

Rosalie, 2006 [Dad Brad]

Jonah, 2008 [Dad Brad]

Jonah, 2008 [Dad Brad]

Maeve, 2010 [Dad Brad]

Maeve, 2010 [Dad Brad]

Owen, 2009 [Dad Jason]

Owen, 2009 [Dad Jason]

Tyler, 2010 [Dad Jason]

Tyler, 2010 [Dad Jason]

Arden, 2011 [Dad Sean]

Arden, 2011 [Dad Sean]

Molly, David, Greta, 2013

Molly, David, Greta, 2013

And finally, a shout out to David, who is always there for my kids (and me!) – including dancing with them in the Nutcracker!

TBT: TRB – The National Academy of Sciences

Thursday, June 5th, 2014

by Mary Ellen Eagan

Abraham_Lincoln_November_1863

I’m at the Transportation Research Board (TRB)’s Keck Center in DC for several Aviation Group mid-year meetings this week. Here’s a bit of The National Academy history (lifted directly from the NAS website):

The National Academy of Sciences was founded on March 3, 1863, at the height of the Civil War.

The immediate roots of the NAS can be traced back to the early 1850s and a group of scientists based largely in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The group enlisted the support of Massachusetts Senator Henry Wilson, who helped draft a bill for the incorporation of the National Academy of Sciences. Wilson brought the bill to the Senate on February 20, 1863, where it was passed on March 3. It was passed by the House of Representatives later that day, and was signed into law by President Lincoln before the day was over. The National Academy of Sciences had officially come into being with 50 charter members, who over the years would be joined by the election of the nation’s most distinguished scientists.

[T]he Academy shall, whenever called upon by any department of the Government, investigate, examine, experiment, and report upon any subject of science or art, the actual expense of such investigations, examinations, experiments, and reports to be paid from appropriations which may be made for the purpose, but the Academy shall receive no compensation whatever for any services to the Government of the United States.

An Act to Incorporate the National Academy of Sciences[4]

Over the years, the National Academy of Sciences has broadened its services to the government. During World War I it became apparent that the limited membership—then numbering only about 150—could not keep up with the volume of requests for advice regarding military preparedness. In 1916 the Academy established the National Research Council (NRC) at the request of President Wilson to recruit specialists from the larger scientific and technological communities to participate in the Academy’s advisory work to the government.  Recognizing the value of scientific advice to the nation in times of peace as well as war, Wilson issued an executive order at the close of World War I asking the Academy to perpetuate the National Research Council. Subsequent executive orders, by President Eisenhower in 1956 and President Bush in 1993, have affirmed the importance of the National Research Council and further broadened its charter.

TRB is a division of NRC. I’m guessing Lincoln never could have imagined some of the discussions that go on in this building, but it somehow seems noble to be carrying out his vision.