Posts Tagged ‘aircraft noise’

ERAU Is Pushing the Envelope Yet Again!

Friday, May 16th, 2014

by Diana Wasiuk

Graduates of my alma mater, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU), have a reputation for ‘pushing the envelope’ in more than one way… The Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) was one of those forward thinking ideas that only a bunch of aviation nuts could come up with and commit to with boundless enthusiasm. And boy did we ever!  Here is an article on another example of ERAU pushing for innovation: developing electric propulsion systems to reduce noise and emissions:
http://daytonatimes.com/2014/05/15/e-rau-to-develop-an-electric-aircraft/.

TRB e-circular “Critical Issues in Aviation and the Environment” published

Friday, April 18th, 2014

By Mary Ellen Eagan

TRB recently published Circular E-C184: “Critical Issues in Aviation and the Environment.” The following summarizes the content of the e-circular.

“Critical Issues in Aviation and the Environment 2014” consists of twelve individually authored sections, representing the authoring experts’ opinions on issues that address the major environmental components affected by aviation activities, sustainable solutions that have evolved and continue to be developed to minimize environmental impacts, and the key processes that link aviation and the environment.

Readers of prior e-circulars in this series may notice that we no longer include a stand-alone section on “sustainability”.  This is because the Committee believes that sustainability is a cross-cutting issue that affects all topics in the environment – it is a way of operating, not an “issue”.  We have added several new topics to this volume:

  1. Natural resource management:  Airports are challenged to address natural resource management issues related to wildlife hazards, natural resource revenue generation (e.g., timber, minerals, energy), and water conservation.
  2. Renewable energy:  this section addresses major issues airports should consider when identifying and developing renewable energy alternatives.
  3. Public Health:  an emerging issue that several airports are facing is the need to develop health impact assessments and health risk assessments to respond to community concerns regarding the impact of airports on communities.

The individually authored sections of this e-circular represent the viewpoints of the attributed authors.  Members and friends of the TRB Environmental Impacts of Aviation Committee have also reviewed and contributed comments to these sections.

Many thanks go to the authors (listed below, by paper):

Environmental Impacts of Aviation on Human and Natural Resources  

  • Noise: Natalia Sizov (Federal Aviation Administration), Brad Rolf (Mead & Hunt), Mary Ellen Eagan (Harris Miller Miller & Hanson Inc.)
  • Air Quality: John Pehrson (CDM), Warren Gillette (Federal Aviation Administration), Brian Kim (Wyle), Prem Lobo (Missouri University of Science and Technology)
  • Climate Change: Judith Patterson (Science College, Concordia University, Montreal, Canada ), Mohan Gupta (Federal Aviation Administration), Rangasayi Halthore (Federal Aviation Administration), Anuja Mahashabde (The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA)
  • Water Quality: Dean Mericas (Mead & Hunt), John Lengel (Gresham Smith & Partners), Richard Davis (Beveridge & Diamond, P.C.)

Sustainable Solutions to Address Environmental Challenges

  • Climate Change Adaptation Planning and Preparedness: John Lengel (Gresham, Smith and Partners), Kristin Lemaster (CDM Smith), Judith Patterson (Concordia University), Andrea Schwartz Freeburg (Federal Aviation Administration)
  • Natural Resource Management: Dean Mericas (Mead & Hunt), Sarah Brammell (Environmental Resource Solutions)
  • Renewable Energy: Steve Barrett (Harris Miller Miller & Hanson Inc.), Bruno Miller (Metron Aviation), Phil Ralston (Port of Portland)
  • Aviation Alternative Fuels Development And Deployment:  Bruno Miller (Metron Aviation), Steve Csonka (CAAFI), Kristin Lewis (Volpe Center/RITA, Jim Hileman (FAA), Mark Rumizen (FAA), Nancy Young (Airlines for America), and John Heimlich (Airlines for America)

Processes and Tools for Implementing Sustainable Solutions

  • Environmental Review under NEPA:  Mary Vigilante (Synergy Consultants), Brad Rolf (Mead & Hunt), John Putnam (Kaplan Kirsch & Rockwell), Donald Scata (FAA), Betsy Delaney (First Environment), Barbara Thomson (First Environment)
  • Environmental Management Systems And Sustainability Measurement: Mary Vigilante (Synergy Consultants), Brad Rolf (Mead & Hunt), John Putnam (Kaplan Kirsch & Rockwell), Donald Scata (FAA), Betsy Delaney (First Environment), Barbara Thomson (First Environment)
  • Aviation Environmental Modeling Tool Suite:  James Hileman (Federal Aviation Administration), Christopher Roof (USDOT RITA)
  • Research Needs in Public Health In Aviation:  Burr Stewart (Burrst), Andrew Dannenberg (CDC), Brian Kim (Wyle), Daniel Jacob (Federal Aviation Administration)

 

HMMH Throwback Thursday (TBT): Field Trips in the Pre-internet Age

Thursday, March 27th, 2014

by Mary Ellen Eagan

My first data collection (“field”) trip was in the spring of 1985.  We were supporting litigation (at an unnamed airport), and needed to know how flight schedules had changed over time (in order to prepare comparison DNL contours).  I was given the daunting task of going to Eastern Airlines Headquarters in Miami (at the time, Eastern was the only known source of historic flight schedule information) to copy pages from the Official Airline Guide (OAG), which looked something like this. 

Official Airline Guide

Official Airline Guide

 

The data needed to be re-typed (into Lotus spreadsheets), sorted, etc. – just to determine average daily flights on any given route.

 

OAG flight schedules

OAG flight schedules

 

That’s how the glamor began.

From Miami, I flew to Portland, Maine for my first trip involving instruments (alas, I’ve been unable to locate a photograph of a Digital Acoustics 607 noise monitor).  Nick Miller and I were measuring noise levels near Naval Air Station Brunswick, home of Pat Wing 5 and the P-3 Orion Naval Patrol. 

 

NAS Brunswick, Maine

NAS Brunswick, Maine

 

What I remember most about that trip – and tell my girls every time we drive past the old base (the base is gone – it’s now Brunswick Executive Airport, but the Fat Boy Drive-in is still going strong!) is that I was so engrossed in managing the noise monitor that I actually screamed the first time an aircraft flew overhead.  In my defense, that plane (a P-3) was on short final and probably at 100’ altitude (I know, because I got to figure that out later) and very quiet.  It was my first experience with ‘startle’.  What I also remember is Nick’s equanimity in the situation, while inside he must have been wondering just how long my career at HMMH would last.

There are so many differences between then and now, but the thing I miss most is the opportunity to get to know colleagues on a personal level.  In those pre-Internet days, once the sun went down, we were done working for the day – no email, no work in the hotel room, no cell phones even to call home.  It left lots of time for exploring neighborhoods, which could sometime be a challenge near remote Naval Air Stations – but who doesn’t like a challenge?  For example, in the photo below, Bob Miller is seen defending me from an unseen rattlesnake near Midland (TX).  We may be way more efficient these days, but are we still having fun?

 

snake hunting near Midland, TX, 1986

snake hunting near Midland, TX, 1986

 

 

Throwback Thursday (TBT): My First Noise Contours

Thursday, March 20th, 2014

by Mary Ellen Eagan

At the risk of mixing social media platforms (and incurring an eye roll from my teenage daughter), I’d like to announce a new blog series at HMMH:  Throwback Thursdays.

This idea was sparked as a result of the recent renovation of our Burlington headquarters, and the desire to preserve this collage that was prepared for the occasion of HMMH’s 10th Anniversary in 1991: 

HMMH-the early years1981-91

HMMH-the early years 1981-91

Our team has invested significant time scanning each of the photos in the collage, and my hope is that we can find something interesting to say about most of them (well, there are some NSFW things that won’t be shared).

My First Noise Contours

I thought I’d start off with a photo of my first noise contours.  As the date indicates, it was November 1984 (yes, I am that old); I was fresh from Cornell and a summer Internship with the Massport Planning Department; still wearing Birkenstocks and going to Grateful Dead shows (yes, I am that old).  Back in the day, this is what noise contour development looked like:

  • Operational Inputs were developed by typing ATC flight progress strips (see below) into a Lotus 1-2-3 spreadsheet on the company’s only computer – a Xerox (which looked something like this): 

 fl-strips-computer

 

  • Flight tracks were developed in one of two ways:  (a) interviewing the Control Tower manager, who would describe nominal controller instructions to pilots (e.g., Climb to 1000’, then turn on course”), or (2) someone (guess who?) would sit in front of a radar scope marking radar return dots on a piece of acetate – literally, dot-to-dot flight tracks.  These days, I just smile at folks who get worked up for only getting a 99% radar track sample to analyze.
FAA Radar scope, circa 1980s

FAA Radar scope, circa 1980s

 

  • Then the real fun began!  We typed the INM “input deck” (I’m a version 2.7 girl – we old-timers mark our age by first model used) into the computer (my colleagues will tell you about their experiences with punch cards, and submitted it to Control Data Corporation (CDC) over a dial-up modem for processing.  Each run cost several hundred dollars – we did a lot of QC before submitting!   Assuming all went well, we then got to DRIVE to Waltham (20 minutes without traffic) to talk to Manny and get the output – a green and white computer printout and (hopefully) a large plot with contours!
MEE’s First Contours:  Groton-New London, November 1984

MEE’s First Contours: Groton-New London, November 1984

Next up:  Zipatone and Field trips of the 1980s!

 

Report from UC Davis Noise and Air Quality Symposium

Friday, February 28th, 2014

First, congratulations to Dan Frazee, 2014 winner of the Walt Gillfillan Award!  Until very recently, Dan was Director of Airport Noise Mitigation at San Diego International Airport where his department oversaw an award-winning residential sound attenuation program, conducted noise data management and led the community Noise Information and Education Program. Previously, he served as Noise Abatement Officer and Airport Operations Officer for the Sacramento County Airport System. He holds an FAA Airline Transport Pilot rating and is an FAA Certified Instrument Flight Instructor. He is also a retired USAF pilot and Army aviator with over 8,000 hours in rotary and fixed wing aircraft and previous work as a military Air Traffic Controller. He holds a BS in Education from The University of North Texas, a MS in Educational Psychology from The University of Texas at Austin, and is a Certified Member AAAE, and served as Chair of the Aircraft Noise working Group on the Environmental Services Committee for ACI. More importantly, he is one of the nicest human beings you will ever meet, and a good friend to many of us at HMMH.  We wish Dan all the best in his “retirement”, which promises to be busy. 

Frazee

This year’s symposium featured several new concepts, including a double-track (admittedly, not new, but something that hadn’t been done for a while), and a “Vendor Showcase” for folks to learn about new product offerings.  Session titles included the following:

  • Performance-Based Navigation: An Overview and Experiences
  • NextGen and NEPA
  • Recent Noise Research
  • Fuel Advances and Emissions Reductions
  • Helicopter Noise Issues
  • Noise Office Responses to Air Quality Inquiries
  • Sound Insulation: The Community View
  • A Decade of Research
  • Upcoming Significant Revisions to FAA Order 1050.1E
  • Health Effects of Aviation

I moderated this last one, and want especially to thank Dr. Anna Hansell of Imperial College London, who spoke about her work on the Aircraft Noise and Cardiovascular Disease near Heathrow, and Dr. Sarav Arunachalam of University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, who talked about his work on health impacts from aviation emissions.  This is a topic we should all monitor closely.