Posts Tagged ‘aviation’

ACRP Report Released on Defining and Measuring Aircraft Delay and Airport Capacity Thresholds

Wednesday, March 12th, 2014

ACRP104coverLast week, the Transportation Research Board’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) released Report 104: Defining and Measuring Aircraft Delay and Airport Capacity Thresholds. The ACRP report offers guidance to help airports understand, select, calculate, and report measures of delay and capacity. The report describes common metrics, identifies data sources, recommends metrics based on an airport’s needs, and suggests ways to potentially improve metrics.

Guidance and recommendations are provided regarding the relevance of particular delay and capacity measures by airport type, airport characteristics, and project lifecycle phase. The report suggests the most appropriate measurement tools at various points in the project development cycle, for specific items in each element, and for different types of airports. The report does recognize that it is not practical to have one threshold that can be applied to all airports.

The report includes additional metrics that would be helpful in the future, one of which is better communication of delays to the general public. The report summarizes that these communications should be easily understandable, able to be used as a common measure at any airport, and applied consistently across all airports. It was also noted that using a more positive metric, such as level of service, rather than using a term such as delay, which has a negative connotation, would better serve the public and the industry overall.

The research, led by TransSolutions of Fort Worth, TX, was conducted under ACRP Project 03-20. The other team members and primary authors of the report included Futterman Consulting of St. Petersburg, FL, Harris Miller Miller & Hanson Inc. of Herndon, VA, and Jasenka Rakas of Berkeley, CA.

Click here to view the report.

Report from UC Davis Noise and Air Quality Symposium

Friday, February 28th, 2014

First, congratulations to Dan Frazee, 2014 winner of the Walt Gillfillan Award!  Until very recently, Dan was Director of Airport Noise Mitigation at San Diego International Airport where his department oversaw an award-winning residential sound attenuation program, conducted noise data management and led the community Noise Information and Education Program. Previously, he served as Noise Abatement Officer and Airport Operations Officer for the Sacramento County Airport System. He holds an FAA Airline Transport Pilot rating and is an FAA Certified Instrument Flight Instructor. He is also a retired USAF pilot and Army aviator with over 8,000 hours in rotary and fixed wing aircraft and previous work as a military Air Traffic Controller. He holds a BS in Education from The University of North Texas, a MS in Educational Psychology from The University of Texas at Austin, and is a Certified Member AAAE, and served as Chair of the Aircraft Noise working Group on the Environmental Services Committee for ACI. More importantly, he is one of the nicest human beings you will ever meet, and a good friend to many of us at HMMH.  We wish Dan all the best in his “retirement”, which promises to be busy. 

Frazee

This year’s symposium featured several new concepts, including a double-track (admittedly, not new, but something that hadn’t been done for a while), and a “Vendor Showcase” for folks to learn about new product offerings.  Session titles included the following:

  • Performance-Based Navigation: An Overview and Experiences
  • NextGen and NEPA
  • Recent Noise Research
  • Fuel Advances and Emissions Reductions
  • Helicopter Noise Issues
  • Noise Office Responses to Air Quality Inquiries
  • Sound Insulation: The Community View
  • A Decade of Research
  • Upcoming Significant Revisions to FAA Order 1050.1E
  • Health Effects of Aviation

I moderated this last one, and want especially to thank Dr. Anna Hansell of Imperial College London, who spoke about her work on the Aircraft Noise and Cardiovascular Disease near Heathrow, and Dr. Sarav Arunachalam of University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, who talked about his work on health impacts from aviation emissions.  This is a topic we should all monitor closely.

Congress Set to Pass Huge FY 2014 Omnibus Appropriations Bill

Wednesday, January 15th, 2014

Many thanks to TJ Schultz (new President of ACC) for eloquently (and quickly!) summarizing the FY14 Appropriations Bill that Congress will (we hope) shortly pass.  Could it be that we can have a reasonably normal year funding-wise?  Know hope.

ACC logo

The U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate are preparing to consider a huge 1,500+ page omnibus appropriations bill that provides funding for all federal agencies in FY 2014, including the FAA and TSA. The omnibus bill is a result of the budget agreement reached by the House and Senate in December, which set overall funding levels for each federal department in 2014 and 2015. The budget agreement removed the automatic sequester cuts, so federal programs will likely not be subject to rescissions this fiscal year or next.

With the current short-term continuing resolution (CR) expiring today, Congress will likely pass an extension bill for a few days to allow each chamber time to consider and pass the omnibus legislation.

Below are the highlights:

Federal Aviation Administration

Final FY 2014 Appropriations Funding Levels (in billions)

FY 2013 Enacted (post sequester)

 

FY 2014 Admin. Budget Request

FY 2014 House

FY 2014 Senate

FY 2014

Final

FAA Total

$15.266

$15.550

$15.171

$15.9

$15.634

  Operations

$9.4

$9.7

$9.5

$9.7

$9.651

  F&E

$2.6

$2.7

$2.15

$2.7

$2.6

  Research

$.158

$.166

$.145

$.160

$.158

  AIP

$3.09

$2.9

$3.35

$3.35

$3.35

Highlights:

  • Funds AIP at its authorized level of $3.35 billion in 2014. With the omnibus likely to pass by next week, the FAA should have more time to work with airport sponsors to distribute AIP funding over the remaining portion of the fiscal year, compared to last year when the FY 2013 appropriations and sequester became final in March.
  • The Operations account is funded at $9.65 billion, which is $255 million above the FY 2013 post-sequestration amount. A total of $140 million is set aside for the contract tower program.
  • Appropriators kept the FAA Facilities & Equipment account at the same post-sequestration FY 2013 funding level, which is $178 million less than the president’s budget request.
  • ACRP is funded at its authorized level of $15 million.
  • $149 million is appropriated for the Essential Air Service program. There is a provision prohibiting DOT from renewing an EAS contract with a community less than 40 miles from a hub airport unless a negotiated cost share with the community has been arranged.

Thank you, Paula!

Tuesday, November 19th, 2013

by Mary Ellen Eagan

Paula Hochsteler, ACC President

Paula Hochsteler, ACC President

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’m just back from the Airport Consultants Council Annual Conference in Tucson, Arizona, where there was an extended appreciation for Paula Hochstetler’s service to ACC and the industry.  I thought I’d add my voice to the chorus of thanks for everything Paula has done to make ACC really be the expert voice of airports.  Paula has been insightful, generous with her time, and a real model of successful implementation of a long range vision.

I also would like to congratulate TJ Schulz on his appointment as ACC’s new President.  I look forward to working with TJ, and watching ACC continue to flourish under his leadership.

Congratulations to you both!

Report from ACI World Environment Standing Committee

Tuesday, May 14th, 2013

by Mary Ellen Eagan

I attended my first ACI World Environment Standing Committee meeting in Montreal Canada last week.  It was interesting to learn that airports struggle with many of the same issues around the world.

One of the emerging issues that will be coming to an airport near you is health effects of aviation.  It’s worth reading the World Health Organization’s publication Methodological guidance for estimating the burden of disease from environmental noise, which focuses on the concept of potential years of life lost due to premature death to include equivalent years of healthy life lost by virtue of individuals being in states of poor health or disability. One DALY can be thought of as one lost year of healthy life.