Posts Tagged ‘faa’

First World Problems, cont’d

Wednesday, April 24th, 2013

by Mary Ellen Eagan,

For those of you wondering if I ever got home, here’s the exciting conclusion:

  • DL 2045 (DCA to DTW) scheduled departure 5:15 pm; actual departure 5:54 pm
  • DL 158 (DTW to BOS) scheduled departure 7:50 pm, actual departure 9:50 pm

Grand total for the trip:

  • 9 boarding passes
  • gate-to-gate Day 1: 6 hours
  • gate-to-gate Day 2: 11 hours
  • flight miles BOS-DCA: 393

People were remarkably patient with the situation. Sure they’re angry, but are placing the blame where it belongs: Congress.

I’d be tempted to call this a ‘Terrible, Horrible, No Good Very Bad Day’, except I’m sure the air traffic situation will get worse before it gets better.  Also, after last week in Boston, it will be a long time before I really have a ‘Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day’.

Alexander and the 'Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day by Judith Vorst

Alexander and the ‘Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day by Judith Vorst

If one of the main functions of society is to facilitate the movement of people and goods, I think we’re failing pretty spectacularly this week. First world, indeed.

FAA Publishes Noise Land Guidance Letter

Tuesday, February 19th, 2013

by Gene Reindel

Is your airport eligible to participate in a pilot program to redevelop properties previously purchased for airport noise compatibility?  Per the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012, the FAA, today, has published Program Guidance Letter (PGL) 13-04 that provides eligibility, project requirements and a checklist for airports to apply for $5 million to redevelop acquired “noise land”.  In addition to grant funding, an eligible airport may submit a PFC approval request.  The FAA is authorized to provide funding at a maximum of four airports for a total of $20 million.  The pilot program authority to issue grants sunsets September 30, 2015.  This pilot program is intended to encourage compatible land uses and generate economic benefits.

Flight Track Data Update

Monday, October 15th, 2012

by Gene Reindel

Apparently the days of free flight track and aircraft identification data direct from the FAA are over.  Beginning this summer, the FAA began informing noise and operations monitoring system (NOMS) vendors of this impending change, but airports were not made aware of this until very recently.  Airports are being asked to come up with as much as $24,000 per year to continue receiving this vital data.  There is no data acquired by NOMS more important than the flight track and aircraft identification data.  Airports that have been acquiring this data for free, must find additional budget during times when airports are trying to reduce their costs.  This change could not have come at a worse time.

Report from 2012 ACI-NA/World Conference & Exhibition

Wednesday, September 12th, 2012

by Mary Ellen Eagan

I’m just back from the 2012 ACI-NA/World Conference in Calgary, Alberta.  Highlights of the weekend’s Environmental Affairs Conference included the following:

The ACI-NA/World Conference and Exhibition kicked off with the Calgary White Hat Ceremony, a symbol of the Western hospitality and good cheer that made everyone feel very welcome.  Somehow I’m having trouble imagining that happening with a bunch of Red Sox hats…

Calgary White Hats Ceremony

Monday’s keynote speaker was Zanny Minton Beddoes, Economics editor for The Economist. She had some great things to say about her predictions for the economy, some of which was actually reassuring (for a change).

The Exhibit Hall was the usual mélange of consulting firms, concessionaires, and airport engineering products and services – everything from carpets to trains.  The Hall is always a great chance to catch up with folks – see who has switched companies, grab a latte, check out who has the best swag, etc.

Finally, I must say I was disappointed not to get a chance to explore Calgary, which seems a vibrant city, awash in oil and gas money. What little I did see (see photos below of the Family of Man and The Famous Five) was beautiful. Next time!

Family of Man, Calgary

Famous 5 Statue (not Clint Eastwood!), Calgary

 

Sustainable Opulence

Monday, April 23rd, 2012

by Mary Ellen Eagan

Vegas, Baby.  Just returned from four days in Vegas, attending the ACI-NA Environmental Affairs Conference and the TRB Environmental Impacts of Aviation (AV030) Mid-year meeting. 

This year the Environmental Affairs Conference teamed with the Operations and Technical Affairs Conference.  There were several joint sessions, most notably on Integrating RNAV/RNP into the airport setting.  Other hot topics included:

  • Further discussion of FAA’s impending Program Guidance Letter on Residential Sound Insulation.  Latest word is that ACI-NA and other industry groups will have an opportunity to review the draft shortly.  Stand by.
  • Air toxics and other ongoing air quality studies in the Los Angeles area.
  • Strategies for noise stringency at upcoming CAEP meeting.
  • PBN implementation and integration with airports:  “NextGen begins and ends at airports”.

Our TRB meeting covered a lot of ground in a few hours, including:

I had been dreading holding two environmental meetings in Las Vegas, which I have long considered one of the least sustainable places on earth.  However, after listening to these two guys talk about water conservation initiatives in Las Vegas – not just including the Strip, but especially the Strip – I was quite impressed.  Following the meeting, several of us had dinner in the Aria Hotel, which has achieved USGBC LEED Gold Certification.   More on the City Center’s Environmental Commitment – including an on-site cogeneration plant, specially designed low flow shower heads, and CNG limos here.  My only wish is that it would be more visible to the tourist with an environmental conscience.  This is one of those cases where what happens in Vegas shouldn’t stay in Vegas.

Keeping with its commitment to sustainability, CityCenter has commissioned the first stretch-limo fleet powered by compressed natural gas (CNG).