Posts Tagged ‘hmmh’

HMMH Assists FAA and Airports in Standardizing the Process for Determining Sound Insulation Program Eligibility

Tuesday, June 7th, 2016

by J. Eric Cox

HMMH has provided acoustical testing, design, and other consulting services to airports throughout the country that have implemented sound insulation programs in accordance with FAA Order 5100.38D Airport Improvement Program (AIP) Handbook. HMMH has most recently been conducting sound insulation measurements around several airports including:

  • T. F. Green State Airport (PVD) in Providence, Rhode Island
  • Tweed – New Haven Airport (HVN) in New Haven, Connecticut
  • Louisville International Airport (SDF) in Louisville, Kentucky (shown below)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Over the last several months, HMMH has also assisted the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and airport sponsors in standardizing the process for determining sound insulation program eligibility per current FAA requirements and criteria, which include that the average interior noise level for a residential building or educational facility must be 45 dB or greater.This work has included a recently completed Policy, Engineering, Analysis and Research Support (PEARS) study for the FAA Office of Environment and Energy regarding selection of appropriate aircraft noise spectra for use in determining outdoor-to-indoor building noise level reduction (NLR).

In addition, we have assisted several airport authorities (including Los Angeles World Airports and the Port of Seattle) in developing sound insulation program acoustical testing plans (ATP) for FAA review. This work has included providing additional information and supporting details related to the various methods that may be used to measure the exterior building façade sound level in the determination of NLR, each of which require a different adjustment to the measured level to account for the reflection of sound energy from the façade under test that is not transmitted through the exterior wall and instead travels back to the measurement microphone.

And as part of our on-going sound insulation testing work at Louisville International Airport, we have recently been evaluating noise mitigation program eligibility for several educational buildings and residential dormitories at the nearby University of Louisville Belknap Campus. This has required us to evaluate methods to compute daytime average sound levels (as required for educational facilities by FAA) that are consistent with the noise study, aircraft operations data, and analysis methods previously utilized to generate the Day-Night Average Sound Level (DNL) noise contours for the Noise Exposure Map (NEM).

Finally, I will be presenting a paper at the New England Noise-Con Revolution in Noise Control conference to be held in Providence, Rhode Island during June 13 – 15, 2016. This paper investigates the correlation between aircraft interior noise levels and various residential building construction features. The results of this analysis are then considered in the context of the current guidance provided in Appendix R of the FAA AIP handbook, which specifics a procedure to determine the eligibility of residences for sound insulation programs based on interior noise levels for categories of homes. Ultimately, we were unable to identify any specific building construction details which might result in truly effective categorizations of residential structures for this purpose since even the best possible approaches resulted in ranges of interior DNL noise levels that directly overlap and all of which span the 45 dB FAA criteria. An example presentation graphic is provided below comparing average interior DNL values for single family homes with total window assembly glazing thickness.

graph
If you are interested and would like to learn more, please attend my Noise-Con presentation entitled “Investigation of Correlation between Aircraft Interior Noise Levels and Residential Building Construction Details” on Tuesday June 14, 2016 from 1:20 PM – 1:40 PM in Room 550 A/B of the Omni Providence Hotel during the “Building Acoustics Measurement and Modeling” conference session. Hope to see you there!

 

 

ICAO Green Technologies Seminar

Friday, September 26th, 2014

by Stephen Barrett

The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) convened its first seminar focused entirely on Green Technologies at its headquarters in Montreal on September 9 and 10. The program occurred just days after the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) issued a report stating that carbon dioxide levels rose in 2013 at unprecedented rates.

The seminar ran a gamut of green technology issues in aviation, from those associated with aircraft (cleaner burning engines, alternative fuels, more efficient airspace procedures) to green buildings fueled by renewable energy and minimizing surface transportation effects. The team from Solar Impulse, the solar powered plane that flew across the US and Europe in 2013 and is now redesigning its aircraft for a round-the-world flight, participated in the seminar through two video presentations that provided inspiration to the participants as to what can be achieved. At an evening reception, Airbus made a formal release of its single passenger electric-powered plane which was previous unveiled at its headquarters over the summer. The two companies also discussed technologies that can be readily incorporated into existing planes to allow them to taxi on the ground entirely on electric power.

I was fortunate to be asked to make a presentation on the opportunities for airports to develop renewable energy to power on-site facilities. During my presentation, I reviewed a variety of technologies – including solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, hydrokinetics, and fuel cells – and discussed the state of the technology, its markets and applications, and compatibility with airports including examples from around the world. ICAO would like to make this type of information more readily available to member states and there are plans to provide guidance on a variety of green technologies based on information that was presented at the seminar.

As Solar Impulse 2 prepares for its round-the-world flight in 2015, it is clear that there are challenges to the world’s aviation industries in a future of climate change, but that there are also opportunities to those who seize them.

ICAO Green Technologies Seminar

ICAO Green Technologies Seminar

ACRP Releases HMMH-authored Report on Energy Projects and Airports and Airspace

Friday, April 25th, 2014

by Stephen Barrett

HMMH is pleased to inform clients and colleagues of the official release of Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Report 108 “Energy Technologies Compatibility with Airports and Airspace.” This report is the first in a series of ACRP Reports on energy and airports that are expected for release in the next year. The HMMH-authored report reviews the aviation industry’s experience with a variety of energy technologies including solar, wind, oil and gas drilling, and traditional electricity generation and transmission, and provides guidance for future projects to avoid impacts on airports and airspace. The report is timely given the country’s focus on domestic energy production to serve economic and national security interests and to diversify energy generation sources toward cleaner fuels, including renewables. The guidance will also help airports as they consider opportunities to lease out underutilized non-aeronautical property for energy production.

ACRP Report 108

Throwback Thursday – Where Are They Now?

Thursday, April 17th, 2014

by Mary Ellen Eagan

The photo below is from HMMH’s first corporate brochure, which was published in 1984 (just before your humble author joined the firm).  The photo was taken at the Masonic Museum in Lexington.

HMMH-personnel-500px

Front: Chris Menge, Chris Conklin, Bob Miller, Cathy Abbot. Back: Carl Hanson, Monique Benoit, Andy Harris, Nick Miller, Ted Baldwin, Alice Sewall

Thought you might like to know where they are now:

Andy Harris  aka, “the first H”, is now fully retired and enjoying his retirement home near Naples, FL.  I still remember the day Andy ordered me to his cubicle to tell me I “had leadership potential, but needed to straighten up.”  Thank you, Andy.

Nick Miller (aka, “one of the M’s”) – they refuse to disclose who comes first, and btw, they are NOT brothers – is currently having the time of his life work with FAA to update the aircraft noise annoyance dose-response curve (the “Schultz Curve” – which is really awesome, since Ted Schultz was an early mentor of Nick’s at BBN.  But I digress).  He’s also trying to spend more time with his wife Andrea, kids and grand kids at his second home in Bar Harbor (ME).

Bob Miller (aka “the other M”) is also still fully engaged at HMMH, leading several NEPA projects, shepherding our federal projects, and still occasionally pulling an all-nighter (sometimes even work-related).  Bob juggles kids, grand kids, and tennis, and is happy to have Dana mostly to himself these days.  And lives for summer in Osawa.

Carl Hanson retired in 2011, and is spending much more time with his 1956 Jaguar, 1940’s-vintage Ford truck, wife Singe, and daughter Siri (not necessarily in that order).  He still stops by for an occasional social hour.

Alice Sewall was HMMH’s first Office Manager. When I met her, she was single-handedly refurbishing a beautiful Victorian worthy of This Old House.  She contributed to my workplace feminist outrage.  And taught me to knit.

Monique Benoit is now a travel consultant in Southern California.

Chris Conklin was a high school student who helped with a wide variety of tasks (in the old – pre-internet – days, it was a job called “go-fer”; now it probably has some lofty term).  I’m hoping HMMH was influential in his choosing to work in this field; he’s now a Principal at VHB in the Washington, D.C. area.

Cathy Abbot left HMMH in the late 1980s after having her third child (Carolyn recently graduated from Ithaca College with a PhD in physical therapy!).  Once all her kids were in school, Cathy spent 20+ years as a physics teacher at Lexington HS, and is now working as a content developer for a physics website.

Ted Baldwin is still very much with HMMH, and is currently working on as many Part 150s as he’s ever had at once!  He’s also Vice Chair of HMMH’s Board of Directors.  In his free time, he and Betsy sail the ‘Sarah B’, and spend lots of time with grandchildren.

Chris Menge is also still very active at HMMH, and manages our highway work for VDOT, MassDOT and other DOTs.  He and Ginny spend lots of time with family, too – including two grandchildren!

 

Throwback Thursday (TBT) – HMMH Offices Through the Years

Thursday, April 3rd, 2014

by Mary Ellen Eagan

We’ve just gone through a renovation here at HMMH’s world headquarters (the major remaining punch list item is installation of a dart board for our Thursday afternoon beer crowd).  Here’s a look at HMMH’s Boston-area offices since the beginning.

HMMH’s First Office (1981-1983): Lexington, MA

HMMH’s First Boston-Area Office (1981-1983): Lexington, MA

HMMH’s Second Boston-Area Office (1983-1993): Lexington, MA

HMMH’s Second Boston-Area Office (1983-1993): Lexington, MA 

HMMH’s Third Boston-Area Office (1993-2005): Burlington, MA

HMMH’s Third Boston-Area Office (1993-2005): Burlington, MA

HMMH’s Current Headquarters (2005-present): Burlington, MA

HMMH’s Current Headquarters (2005-present): Burlington, MA