Posts Tagged ‘noise’

FAA Announces the Release of AEDT 2b

Thursday, September 11th, 2014

by Robert C. Mentzer Jr.

The FAA announced on September 8, 2014 that the Aviation Environmental Design Tool version 2b (AEDT 2b)a next generation noise and emission model designed for airports, will be released on May 29th, 2015.  The upcoming version is expected to replace the FAA’s INM and EDMS models which have been used separately for noise and emissions modeling for several decades.  AEDT 2b will combine these two models along with the latest airport and aircraft data to provide airports and consultants a tool to develop noise, emission, and fuel burn results.  One set of data inputs (airfield, aircraft operations, etc.) will allow the user to develop results for all three categories and for different phases of flight.  This will also result in the user being able to understand the consequences of various changes at an airport from one tool.  AEDT 2areleased in 2013 to replace NIRS, is currently available for regional and larger scale analysis such as air traffic redesign studies.

TBT: Noise Measurements at Idlewild

Thursday, July 17th, 2014

by Mary Ellen Eagan

I’ve been spending a lot of time the last few weeks thinking about evolution of noise issues at the Port Authority (of New York and New Jersey), and thought some of you might also appreciate these photos of early efforts to measure noise levels at JFK (then-Idlewild).

Group in New York discussing noise measurements of the British Comet 4 jet aircraft, August 1958.  Laymon Miller (Bob Miller’s dad) is seated at the far left; Beranek wears glasses.  John Wiley and Austin Tobin are standing second and third from the left, respectively.  The others are representatives from British Airways and the Port of New York Authority.

Group in New York discussing noise measurements of the British Comet 4 jet aircraft, August 1958. Laymon Miller (Bob Miller’s dad) is seated at the far left; Beranek wears glasses. John Wiley and Austin Tobin are standing second and third from the left, respectively. The others are representatives from British Airways and the Port of New York Authority.

ICBEN 2014

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014

by Nick Miller

I attended the recent (June 2014) conference held by the International Commission on Biological Effects of Noise (ICBEN) in Nara Japan. The presentations were all about the possible bad effects of noise on humans. Overall, it’s a confabulation of people who are engaged in rigorous scientific exploration of how noise might produce ill effects, and by and large everyone is quite circumspect about any tentative conclusions suggested by their work. But let the press get ahold of the summary information, and you can get headlines like: “Is the noise of modern life making you ill? It can trigger heart disease, blood pressure and weight gain – even when you’re asleep.”

But researchers on the same team can come to different opinions such as: “Yes noise probably does cause heart problems,” and “No, noise probably doesn’t cause heart problems.”

So what gives? What gives in my opinion is that research results usually show just slight probabilities of adverse effect, and I’m inclined to think personal leanings (some might say prejudices) influence the interpretations of results. I’m not saying that there’s anything political or ideological here, only that different people draw different conclusions from the same results. I think, and I believe I read this somewhere – probably something David Brooks wrote (how’s that for a reference?) – that people make their decisions emotionally and then look for supporting evidence.

Reflect for a minute on some of your strongly held opinions and dig deeply to see if there really is any logical basis for them. As far as the effects of noise are concerned, I’ve detected two basic prejudices at work: “Noise is guilty and you have to prove it’s not.” “Noise is innocent until proven guilty.” Which is yours?

Nara, Japan

Nara, Japan

Around conference area

Around conference area

Nara, Japan

Nara, Japan

TBT – HMMH’s First Model

Thursday, May 29th, 2014

Yuki Kimura working with HMMH’s proprietary software StamPEDE – STAMINA Preprocessor for Easy Data Entry. It was used with a digitizer to enter coordinates for roadways, barriers and receivers to be used in the STAMINA highway noise prediction model.

hmmh-1stModel01-500px

hmmh-1stModel02-yuki-500px

ERAU Is Pushing the Envelope Yet Again!

Friday, May 16th, 2014

by Diana Wasiuk

Graduates of my alma mater, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU), have a reputation for ‘pushing the envelope’ in more than one way… The Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) was one of those forward thinking ideas that only a bunch of aviation nuts could come up with and commit to with boundless enthusiasm. And boy did we ever!  Here is an article on another example of ERAU pushing for innovation: developing electric propulsion systems to reduce noise and emissions:
http://daytonatimes.com/2014/05/15/e-rau-to-develop-an-electric-aircraft/.