Posts Tagged ‘noise’

TBT – HMMH’s First Model

Thursday, May 29th, 2014

Yuki Kimura working with HMMH’s proprietary software StamPEDE – STAMINA Preprocessor for Easy Data Entry. It was used with a digitizer to enter coordinates for roadways, barriers and receivers to be used in the STAMINA highway noise prediction model.

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ERAU Is Pushing the Envelope Yet Again!

Friday, May 16th, 2014

by Diana Wasiuk

Graduates of my alma mater, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU), have a reputation for ‘pushing the envelope’ in more than one way… The Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) was one of those forward thinking ideas that only a bunch of aviation nuts could come up with and commit to with boundless enthusiasm. And boy did we ever!  Here is an article on another example of ERAU pushing for innovation: developing electric propulsion systems to reduce noise and emissions:
http://daytonatimes.com/2014/05/15/e-rau-to-develop-an-electric-aircraft/.

Throwback Thursday – Where Are They Now?

Thursday, April 17th, 2014

by Mary Ellen Eagan

The photo below is from HMMH’s first corporate brochure, which was published in 1984 (just before your humble author joined the firm).  The photo was taken at the Masonic Museum in Lexington.

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Front: Chris Menge, Chris Conklin, Bob Miller, Cathy Abbot. Back: Carl Hanson, Monique Benoit, Andy Harris, Nick Miller, Ted Baldwin, Alice Sewall

Thought you might like to know where they are now:

Andy Harris  aka, “the first H”, is now fully retired and enjoying his retirement home near Naples, FL.  I still remember the day Andy ordered me to his cubicle to tell me I “had leadership potential, but needed to straighten up.”  Thank you, Andy.

Nick Miller (aka, “one of the M’s”) – they refuse to disclose who comes first, and btw, they are NOT brothers – is currently having the time of his life work with FAA to update the aircraft noise annoyance dose-response curve (the “Schultz Curve” – which is really awesome, since Ted Schultz was an early mentor of Nick’s at BBN.  But I digress).  He’s also trying to spend more time with his wife Andrea, kids and grand kids at his second home in Bar Harbor (ME).

Bob Miller (aka “the other M”) is also still fully engaged at HMMH, leading several NEPA projects, shepherding our federal projects, and still occasionally pulling an all-nighter (sometimes even work-related).  Bob juggles kids, grand kids, and tennis, and is happy to have Dana mostly to himself these days.  And lives for summer in Osawa.

Carl Hanson retired in 2011, and is spending much more time with his 1956 Jaguar, 1940’s-vintage Ford truck, wife Singe, and daughter Siri (not necessarily in that order).  He still stops by for an occasional social hour.

Alice Sewall was HMMH’s first Office Manager. When I met her, she was single-handedly refurbishing a beautiful Victorian worthy of This Old House.  She contributed to my workplace feminist outrage.  And taught me to knit.

Monique Benoit is now a travel consultant in Southern California.

Chris Conklin was a high school student who helped with a wide variety of tasks (in the old – pre-internet – days, it was a job called “go-fer”; now it probably has some lofty term).  I’m hoping HMMH was influential in his choosing to work in this field; he’s now a Principal at VHB in the Washington, D.C. area.

Cathy Abbot left HMMH in the late 1980s after having her third child (Carolyn recently graduated from Ithaca College with a PhD in physical therapy!).  Once all her kids were in school, Cathy spent 20+ years as a physics teacher at Lexington HS, and is now working as a content developer for a physics website.

Ted Baldwin is still very much with HMMH, and is currently working on as many Part 150s as he’s ever had at once!  He’s also Vice Chair of HMMH’s Board of Directors.  In his free time, he and Betsy sail the ‘Sarah B’, and spend lots of time with grandchildren.

Chris Menge is also still very active at HMMH, and manages our highway work for VDOT, MassDOT and other DOTs.  He and Ginny spend lots of time with family, too – including two grandchildren!

 

Throwback Thursday (TBT) – HMMH Offices Through the Years

Thursday, April 3rd, 2014

by Mary Ellen Eagan

We’ve just gone through a renovation here at HMMH’s world headquarters (the major remaining punch list item is installation of a dart board for our Thursday afternoon beer crowd).  Here’s a look at HMMH’s Boston-area offices since the beginning.

HMMH’s First Office (1981-1983): Lexington, MA

HMMH’s First Boston-Area Office (1981-1983): Lexington, MA

HMMH’s Second Boston-Area Office (1983-1993): Lexington, MA

HMMH’s Second Boston-Area Office (1983-1993): Lexington, MA 

HMMH’s Third Boston-Area Office (1993-2005): Burlington, MA

HMMH’s Third Boston-Area Office (1993-2005): Burlington, MA

HMMH’s Current Headquarters (2005-present): Burlington, MA

HMMH’s Current Headquarters (2005-present): Burlington, MA

 

 

In Memoriam

Monday, October 28th, 2013

by Mary Ellen Eagan

Laymon Miller

Laymon Miller

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Many of us at HMMH knew Laymon Miller personally – he was an important early contributor to the practice of noise control.  Laymon did much of the early work on aviation and highway noise control, as well as industrial acoustics, as described in this biography prepared for a University of Texas award that Laymon received:

Laymon Miller, Leo Beranek and Walden Clark of BBN in Seattle with Boeing 707 in background

Laymon Miller, Leo Beranek and Walden Clark of BBN in Seattle with Boeing 707 in background

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Most of Laymon’s consulting work was: (1) Noise and vibration control for HVAC (Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning) systems in buildings; (2) noise control for manufacturing plants, aimed at meeting OSHA noise regulations for the protection of workers’ hearing; (3) noise surveys and noise control aimed at protection of communities against the intrusion of excess noise from manufacturing plants, highways, power plants, airports, etc.; (4) noise and vibration control of products for customer acceptance; and (5) vibration isolation designs for achieving very low vibration levels for particular instruments or processes.

From my perspective, one of Laymon’s greatest contributions – not only to the field of acoustics, but also to the world – is Bob Miller, one of HMMH’s founders and former Chairman of the Board.   Bob mirrors not just Laymon’s passion for acoustics, but his courtesy and grace, and is a constant reminder that scientific inquiry and curiosity are a wonder.

Laymon will be missed, and our thoughts and prayers go to Bob and his family.