Posts Tagged ‘renewable energy’

My first month at HMMH

Monday, March 20th, 2017

by Katherine B. Preston

Now that I have been a member of the HMMH team for about a month and have everything figured out (if only), I decided it was time to write my first blog post.  First, let me say that I am very excited to be a part of this wonderful firm!  Having worked closely with Mary Ellen and Gene for years while at ACI-NA, I was not surprised to learn that the rest of my new colleagues at HMMH are equally as intelligent, passionate, welcoming and well-respected in their fields.  Most importantly they are a patient bunch, having gracefully fielded my many questions about time sheets, expense reports, project numbers, and where to find things located on the network.  Thankfully, I think I am starting to get the hang of it.

The past month has been quite the whirlwind, and included visits to the home office in Burlington and several airport clients, the Florida Airport Council’s State Summit, my first industry conference as a non-association staff, and a visit up to my old D.C. stomping grounds to attend FAA’s Environment and Energy REDAC meeting!  One of the most interesting experiences was attending the ACC/AAAE Airport Planning, Design & Construction Symposium in New Orleans, LA last month.  The conference brought together consultants and airport staff from a wide variety of disciplines, and I learned a lot about airport planning, how to write a great proposal, and the client interview pitfalls to avoid.  It was also great to catch up with old friends and colleagues and meet new ones.  I was proud to hand out my new HMMH business cards, and fortunately I brought plenty, because there were over 1000 people at the event!  I will also admit, it was really also nice to simply be an attendee at the conference so I could sit and listen to the panelists, rather than being responsible for planning the sessions.

Now that the dust of my first few weeks is (partially) settled, I am really looking forward to working with HMMH’s current clients, and helping to grow our practice.  For the past several years, I’ve been particularly interested in the exciting sustainability initiatives taking place across our industry, and only see this trend continuing.  Despite the current political climate and the rhetoric from Washington D.C. about rolling back ‘burdensome’ environmental regulations, I see an opportunity for us as an industry to demonstrate just how beneficial sustainability can be in terms of creating operational efficiencies, conserving resources, streamlining processes, positively engaging stakeholders, and of course saving money.  While some benefits are more easily quantifiable than others, I have never heard an airport say they regret incorporating sustainability into their organization.    I look forward to working with airports to help them maximize these benefits, whether by developing a comprehensive sustainability program or undertaking individual initiatives like a renewable energy project or greenhouse gas inventory.

The next few months will continue to be a learning experience for me personally as I transition from the association world to aviation consulting, and for the industry as a whole as we navigate a changing political and regulatory landscape. But I am fortunate to be learning from and working with the best here at HMMH!

Pre-Publication Release of ACRP Report 151 – Developing a Business Case for Renewable Energy at Airports

Tuesday, December 1st, 2015

acrp151_report-cover_280HMMH is pleased to announce the pre-publication release of ACRP Report 151 – Developing a Business Case for Renewable Energy at Airports by the Transportation Research Board (TRB). The report, authored by Stephen Barrett, Director of Climate and Energy, and Philip DeVita, Director of Air Quality, focuses on identifying and communicating the inherent benefits of renewable energy as part of the business case analysis. To reinforce its practical application, the Guidebook presents direct experience in renewable energy business case development to show both how those attributes are valued differently by different organizations with different missions, and how this broader renewable energy business experience translates to the airport business. The guidebook reviews the criteria used to evaluate a renewable energy project and presents a system for weighting evaluation factors, including long-term self-sustainability and environmental/social considerations, based on the airport’s particular objectives. It walks through a model business case and evaluates the key factors fundamental in the renewable energy business case. The Guidebook also provides examples of similar renewable energy business cases from both an airport’s perspective as well as other organizations, including an airline, a university, and a hospital, and the lessons learned for airports.

This report was the first ever released by the Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) in a “pre-publication” format as part of its interest in accelerating the presentation of its research products to the industry, and demonstrates the high-level of confidence in the draft product. The pre-publication version was released in November 2015 and a final edited Guidebook is expected in the second quarter of 2016.

 

 

Cochin International Airport Goes Solar

Tuesday, September 1st, 2015

By Phil DeVita

CochinAirport_Solar

Last week while scanning through the aviation links I received through email, I came across an article in the digital version of Time magazine for a 12 MW solar project at the Cochin International Airport in India.  What caught my attention was that HMMH worked on this project early on during the design stages.  Unbeknownst to me, Cochin will be the first solar airport in the world generating all of its electrical needs from the sun.  We have worked on many solar projects at airports; however, most of the projects are designed to offset a relatively small portion of the overall electrical needs at the airport. Airports are a large user of electricity, so for an airport to size a solar project to meet all of its demand is truly unique!

The project is comprised of over 46,000 solar panels on 45 acres of land.  Before requesting bids from interested parties to develop the site, Cochin International Airport approached HMMH to evaluate solar glare from the panels to ensure that the project was compatible with airspace associated with the airport, specifically the FAA interim guidance in lieu of similar airport solar PV guidance in India.  As part of the evaluation, we looked at multiple sites and preferred designs to ensure potential glare at the air traffic control tower and for pilots on approach to Runway 9/27 was consistent with the FAA interim guidance.

It’s great to see more and more airports are committing to solar for generating on-site power.  Solar when sited correctly at airports presents a great opportunity to generate renewable energy while reducing carbon emissions and meeting sustainability goals.  Cochin International Airport has set the bar for other airports and is a shining example that solar generation has a bright future in meeting the large energy demands required at an airport.  We are proud to say that not only have we worked on the largest airport solar project in the world at Indianapolis International Airport (17.5 MW), but have also worked on the first airport entirely powered by solar panels!

Transportation Research Board Releases HMMH-Authored ACRP Report 141 – Renewable Energy as an Airport Revenue Source

Wednesday, August 12th, 2015

By Stephen Barrett, LEED AP

acrp_rpt_141_report-coverx280

 

I am pleased to announce the release of TRB’s ACRP Report 141 – Renewable Energy as an Airport Revenue Source. I authored the report with my colleague Philip DeVita and we were supported by team members from Frasca and Associates, Foley & Lardner LLP, Plante Environmental, and SunPower Corp.  Report 141 provides the aviation industry with new information and guidance on the ownership structure and financial accounting behind an increasing number of airport renewable energy projects.  Airports are constantly looking for alternative revenue streams to increase their competitiveness and grow their businesses. They also are exploring ways to use technology to run more efficiently and achieve meaningful cost savings that can be passed on to anchor tenants in the form of more competitive rates and charges. Airports are rich in land and buildings connected to regional infrastructure that provide cost-effective investment opportunities that will benefit the airport business well into the future. Renewable energy has become mainstream as a result of technological advancement, market maturity, and public sector policy and investment with profound benefits to power markets. Renewable energy has diversified the sources of energy and decentralized the power generation network increasing competition, expanding infrastructure investments, and improving national energy security and reliability of the electrical grid. It has increased regional competition for emerging energy generation with states vying for the new business opportunities and markets. It has also demonstrated the viability of a future carbon free economy with the design of high performance buildings that use less energy and supply what is needed through renewable sources. ACRP Report 141 describes renewable energy technologies, airport and renewable energy financing considerations, steps for project implementation, and a summary of 21 airport renewable energy case studies representing various technologies and funding strategies.  It also includes a comprehensive list of all of the solar projects at airports in the U.S., a matrix of renewable energy funding opportunities, a solar feasibility case study, and a sample airport renewable energy RFP.  I will present the report’s findings at the Airports Going Green Conference on October 27 in Chicago.

HMMH Awarded Renewable Energy Consultant Contract at Salt Lake City Airport

Friday, July 10th, 2015

By Stephen Barrett, LEED AP

SLCDA

HMMH is working with the Salt Lake City Department of Airports to assess opportunities to deploy renewable energy projects in a cost-effective way as part of the design and planning of the airport’s $1.8 billion redevelopment program. Part of this program includes meeting Leadership on Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standards and obtaining credits associated with renewable energy generation and use. One component being considered is covered parking with solar canopies and issues associated with snow and ice. We are also conducting a comprehensive technical and financial feasibility assessment of deploying solar on the property of Salt Lake City Airport. This work evaluates the physical constraints to siting solar on airport property including available land and buildings, proximity to existing electrical infrastructure, consistency with the ALP and airport safety zone, compliance with the FAA’s Interim Solar Policy and ocular hazard standard for glare, and potential environmental resources and effect on permitting. HMMH will also be investigating emission reduction technologies that can receive dedicated funding from the FAA to improve air quality in the Salt Lake Valley which is designated by the Environmental Protection Agency as a non-attainment zone for clean air standards. The HMMH team for this project includes Brendle Group, Blymyer Engineers, Foley & Lardner, and VHB.