Posts Tagged ‘sound insulation’

HMMH Assists FAA and Airports in Standardizing the Process for Determining Sound Insulation Program Eligibility

Tuesday, June 7th, 2016

by J. Eric Cox

HMMH has provided acoustical testing, design, and other consulting services to airports throughout the country that have implemented sound insulation programs in accordance with FAA Order 5100.38D Airport Improvement Program (AIP) Handbook. HMMH has most recently been conducting sound insulation measurements around several airports including:

  • T. F. Green State Airport (PVD) in Providence, Rhode Island
  • Tweed – New Haven Airport (HVN) in New Haven, Connecticut
  • Louisville International Airport (SDF) in Louisville, Kentucky (shown below)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Over the last several months, HMMH has also assisted the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and airport sponsors in standardizing the process for determining sound insulation program eligibility per current FAA requirements and criteria, which include that the average interior noise level for a residential building or educational facility must be 45 dB or greater.This work has included a recently completed Policy, Engineering, Analysis and Research Support (PEARS) study for the FAA Office of Environment and Energy regarding selection of appropriate aircraft noise spectra for use in determining outdoor-to-indoor building noise level reduction (NLR).

In addition, we have assisted several airport authorities (including Los Angeles World Airports and the Port of Seattle) in developing sound insulation program acoustical testing plans (ATP) for FAA review. This work has included providing additional information and supporting details related to the various methods that may be used to measure the exterior building façade sound level in the determination of NLR, each of which require a different adjustment to the measured level to account for the reflection of sound energy from the façade under test that is not transmitted through the exterior wall and instead travels back to the measurement microphone.

And as part of our on-going sound insulation testing work at Louisville International Airport, we have recently been evaluating noise mitigation program eligibility for several educational buildings and residential dormitories at the nearby University of Louisville Belknap Campus. This has required us to evaluate methods to compute daytime average sound levels (as required for educational facilities by FAA) that are consistent with the noise study, aircraft operations data, and analysis methods previously utilized to generate the Day-Night Average Sound Level (DNL) noise contours for the Noise Exposure Map (NEM).

Finally, I will be presenting a paper at the New England Noise-Con Revolution in Noise Control conference to be held in Providence, Rhode Island during June 13 – 15, 2016. This paper investigates the correlation between aircraft interior noise levels and various residential building construction features. The results of this analysis are then considered in the context of the current guidance provided in Appendix R of the FAA AIP handbook, which specifics a procedure to determine the eligibility of residences for sound insulation programs based on interior noise levels for categories of homes. Ultimately, we were unable to identify any specific building construction details which might result in truly effective categorizations of residential structures for this purpose since even the best possible approaches resulted in ranges of interior DNL noise levels that directly overlap and all of which span the 45 dB FAA criteria. An example presentation graphic is provided below comparing average interior DNL values for single family homes with total window assembly glazing thickness.

graph
If you are interested and would like to learn more, please attend my Noise-Con presentation entitled “Investigation of Correlation between Aircraft Interior Noise Levels and Residential Building Construction Details” on Tuesday June 14, 2016 from 1:20 PM – 1:40 PM in Room 550 A/B of the Omni Providence Hotel during the “Building Acoustics Measurement and Modeling” conference session. Hope to see you there!

 

 

Report from 2012 ACI-NA/World Conference & Exhibition

Wednesday, September 12th, 2012

by Mary Ellen Eagan

I’m just back from the 2012 ACI-NA/World Conference in Calgary, Alberta.  Highlights of the weekend’s Environmental Affairs Conference included the following:

The ACI-NA/World Conference and Exhibition kicked off with the Calgary White Hat Ceremony, a symbol of the Western hospitality and good cheer that made everyone feel very welcome.  Somehow I’m having trouble imagining that happening with a bunch of Red Sox hats…

Calgary White Hats Ceremony

Monday’s keynote speaker was Zanny Minton Beddoes, Economics editor for The Economist. She had some great things to say about her predictions for the economy, some of which was actually reassuring (for a change).

The Exhibit Hall was the usual mélange of consulting firms, concessionaires, and airport engineering products and services – everything from carpets to trains.  The Hall is always a great chance to catch up with folks – see who has switched companies, grab a latte, check out who has the best swag, etc.

Finally, I must say I was disappointed not to get a chance to explore Calgary, which seems a vibrant city, awash in oil and gas money. What little I did see (see photos below of the Family of Man and The Famous Five) was beautiful. Next time!

Family of Man, Calgary

Famous 5 Statue (not Clint Eastwood!), Calgary

 

Beating the Heat: Sound Insulation Provides More than Noise Control

Monday, September 19th, 2011

by J. Eric Cox

It has been a very hot summer; in fact it was the fifth warmest on record for the Northern Hemisphere. Several parts of the country are experiencing severe drought, including Texas. HMMH has recently been conducting pre- and post-construction sound insulation measurements around several airports in these particularly hot and humid conditions:

 Working outdoors in extreme weather with the heat index typically approaching 110 has presented HMMH personnel with many unique challenges. In addition to always remembering sunscreen, hats, and sunglasses as well as being careful to stay hydrated, we have learned to avoid burns from hot metal equipment, evade Texas red wasps, dodge Florida thunderstorms, record information on and preserve sweat-soaked data sheets, politely convince residents to turn off air conditioning and open curtains/blinds during acoustical testing and work around increased indoor activity since it is often too hot for homeowners to take children, the elderly, or pets away from the home.

While the main purpose of a sound insulation program is to reduce residents’ exposure to indoor noise generated by arriving and departing aircraft, there is another significant ancillary benefit that should not be overlooked: increased thermal insulation. That’s right, sound insulation also makes a building greener, decreasing energy consumption and homeowner utility costs. I have always found interacting with homeowners and assisting in a program that improves their quality of life quite rewarding. It is nice to know we are also helping to reduce their carbon footprint and associated monthly costs as a bonus.

HMMH personnel have worked in extreme weather at the other end of the spectrum too, where homeowners are also likely to experience benefits beyond noise abatement. As I write this, we are next scheduled to conduct post-construction acoustical testing at Our Lady Help of Christians, a historic Catholic church near to Buffalo-Niagara International. We are also providing on-going acoustical services for the residential sound insulation program at the airport. In addition to Buffalo NY, our team has conducted sound insulation measurements in the snow in several locations, including Alaska and…believe it or not (I have the photo to prove it folks)…Tulsa International in Oklahoma!

Bucket Truck in Tulsa, OK

ANMS Conference Debrief

Wednesday, November 10th, 2010

by Mike Carr

Eugene Reindel and I recently attended the 10th Annual Airport Noise Mitigation Symposium (ANMS), hosted by San Francisco International Airport (SFO) in San Francisco, California. ANMS is the only U.S. conference pertaining directly to the issues relating to airport noise mitigation. The theme this year played off of the San Francisco’s iconic Golden Gate Bridge; Building a Bridge to Compatibility.

This year’s conference was a great success and enjoyed by all (from what I heard). This is in no small part due to the great job of the Symposium’s planning committee which was co-chaired by Michael McCarron of San Francisco International Airport, and Carla Kell-Smith of C. Kell-Smith & Associates, Inc. The agenda had a great mix of presentation styles and topics from across the industry.  Mix that with a humorous, facetious, yet educational keynote address on the history of Sound Insulation from Carl Rosenberg of Acentech, a Napa/Sonoma Valley wine tour, and golf tourney overlooking the bay and you might just have a hit.

As for the actual session, topics ranged from FAA roundtable discussions, airport land acquisition, adding a green/sustainable focus to your program, and my personal favorite… Sound Insulation and Testing (although I’m biased). One topic of particular interest, which kept sneaking into sessions and conversations, was the Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) update to the Guidelines for Sound Insulation of Residences Exposed to Aircraft Operations (Guidelines).

A session directly discussing the ACRP Update to the Guidelines document was presented by Michael Payne of The Jones Payne Group. Michael Payne, who is the Principal Investigator for the Update, offered the following perspective on the purpose and need for the Update:

While there is much useful information in the two previous versions, much of it needs to be updated to reflect current costs, codes and “Best Practices”.

The Approach for the update plans to:

Build upon the two previous versions by maintaining that which is useful and relevant while updating and expanding the Guidelines in key areas such as:

  • Energy performance and sustainability
  • Community Outreach
  • Improvements in Products
  • Current Code and other Regulatory Requirements
  • Bidding methodologies and project costs

Michael’s presentation sparked a decent amount of discussion among attendees; I look forward to seeing the updated Guidelines as they are issued. The final submittal is expected in Fall/Winter 2011, so look for it sometime after.

On a side note, special congratulations are also in order for Michael Payne, as he was this year’s recipient of the Randy Jones Award for Excellence in Airport Noise Mitigation.

HMMH has had the opportunity to be involved in the ANMS since nearly the beginning, providing sponsorship, chairing or moderating sessions, presenting paper, and participating as members of the planning committee. This was my first year of involvement, both in attending the conference and participating on the planning committee.  I’m looking forward to participating and seeing all of your shining faces at the 11th annual ANMS in the ‘Lou (NO NOT THE LOO! St Louis!). 

Airport Noise Mitigation Discussed in Boca Raton, Florida

Friday, October 9th, 2009

by Gene Reindel

The Boca Raton Airport Authority hosted the ninth annual AAAE Airport Noise Mitigation Symposium (ANMS), which turned out to be one of the best nine years.  Kim Singer, Boca Raton Airport Authority Public Affairs and ANMS Chair for 2009, provided venue in Delray Beach that will be nearly impossible to beat, and scheduled a tour of their recently completed sound insulation program which highlighted the designs required to meet the recently updated codes in south Florida.

In between the fun, the ANMS provided attendees with applicable information for implementing a successful airport sound insulation or land acquisition program as part of their noise mitigation.  Topics ranged from shrinking noise contours to noise programs outside the 65 DNL on the noise side, to dealing with homeowners and green technologies on the implementation side, to implementing land acquisition programs and disposing of land acquired for noise purposes.  The most interesting session occurred when contractors and suppliers identified issues prevalent in sound insulation programs around the country and sought out solutions from the roundtable members and the audience.  This session was successful at keeping the audience engaged throughout the duration, much akin to the Merv Griffin Show – okay, now I am dating myself.

I feel compelled to recognize Eric Raboin from the Jones Payne Group in Boston for chairing the ANMS Agenda Committee and for delivering the successful and compelling agenda for the conference attendees.  Due to the economy at airports, the session moderators had a difficult time finding speakers, but through perseverance of the moderators and the unwavering support from Mr. Raboin, all the sessions were a success.  At the ANMS Planning Committee debrief after the Symposium concluded, the entire Committee in attendance thanked Mr. Raboin for his dedication and service with round of applause. 

For airports in the throws of implementing a sound insulation programs and/or a land acquisition program, or for those airports beginning or considering to implement such a program, the ANMS is a must attend event.  The social networking with peers in similar programs across the country is undeniably beyond compare.  You will get more information and tools to help ensure a successful program at your airport in two days at the ANMS than you would otherwise obtain in a year of planning.  And the connections you make at the ANMS will remain intact as you continue throughout the year in your programs.

I am already looking forward to the 10th annual ANMS, which will be hosted by San Francisco International Airport in early October, 2010.  Mark your calendars for October 3, 4, and 5, 1010.  I hope to see you in San Francisco.