Posts Tagged ‘TRB’

Interest in Tire Pavement Noise Keeps Rolling at TRB Annual Meeting

Wednesday, February 16th, 2011

by Doug Barrett

The Transportation Research Board (TRB) held its 90th Annual Meeting in Washington DC from January 23-37. Although I’ve attended many of these meetings, the size and breadth of the annual meeting always astonish me. This year’s meeting set a new record (over 10,900) and, as usual, there were workshops and sessions covering everything under the sun related to transportation.

As the primary source of traffic noise, tire-pavement noise continues to be a hot topic in the highway noise world. Although the ADC40 Committee on Transportation-Related Noise and Vibration is just one small part of the annual meeting, in recent years the Committee has broadened its scope by co-sponsoring sessions with other committees. This year, ADC40 co-sponsored three workshops or sessions on tire-pavement topics. Sunday morning’s workshop titled “Implementing Noise-Reducing Pavement Research, an International Perspective: Making Pavement Research Results Work in Practice” was followed by Monday’s session on the “Effect of Asphalt Mixture Composition on Friction and Noise,” and Wednesday’s “Tire-Pavement Noise” session. Co-sponsors of these workshops/sessions included the Committees on Surface Properties-Vehicle Interaction (AFD90), Characteristics of Asphalt-Aggregate Combinations to Meet Surface Requirements (AFK40), and Pavement Maintenance (AHD20).

One topic covered during these sessions was the use of On-Board Sound Intensity (OBSI) measurements. OBSI has gained widespread acceptance throughout the U.S. as a standardized approach for quantifying tire-pavement noise. Recently, HMMH conducted OBSI measurements at locations throughout Virginia, on behalf of the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT). The VDOT measurements are part of an ongoing program to document the long-term benefits of pavement overlays. OBSI measurements, however, not only can document the noise reduction benefits of quieter pavements, but also can help to identify louder pavements. As the noise program manager for another DOT said, his state’s ongoing OBSI test program is not about finding the quietest pavements – it’s about identifying the loudest ones!

OBSI Measurement

OBSI Measurement

Environmental Smackdown – Aviation v. High Speed Rail

Monday, February 14th, 2011

by Mary Ellen Eagan

I’m inspired by a few recent events to pontificate on this subject; those events are:  (1) Joe Biden’s recent remarks on high speed rail (HSR) in the US, (2) Greg Principato’s response, and (3) a recent session at the TRB Annual Meeting: “Environmental Tradeoffs of Aviation and High Speed Rail”.

First, let me be clear:  I do not think that one mode of transportation is “better” than another.  In fact, I’m quite sure that we have a need for both and our focus should be on complementarity, not competition.  That said, high speed rail advocates in the U.S. are making statements that unequivocally claim that high speed rail is “better for the environment”.  But let’s check the facts, as far as I’ve gathered them (admittedly, a somewhat cursory review):

  • Capacity:  Matt Coogan and others have prepared a comprehensive case study of the impact of high speed rail on aviation capacity in ACRP 31:  Innovative Approaches to Addressing Aviation Capacity Issues in Coastal Mega-regions.  They conclude that while introduction of Acela Amtrak service between Boston and New York has reduced passenger traffic by about 1/3, the number of flights between the two cities has dropped by only about six percent – shuttle operators have just adapted by substituting smaller aircraft on those routes to meet the schedule demand.
  • Noise:  Noise assessments for aviation and high speed rail both rely on Day Night Average Sound Level, but the similarities end there.  The FRA’s HSR Guidance Manual determines impact on noise sensitive communities by comparing project levels to existing noise levels to determine two categories of impact (moderate and severe), while the FAA’s Order 1050.1E determines impact by identifying noise-sensitive land uses that are projected to experience an increase in noise of 1.5 dB or more in those areas already exceeding DNL 65.  To make matters even more complicated, people appear to respond differently to aircraft noise than rail noise (they are more annoyed by it); on the other hand, if the rail vehicle in question is moving fast enough to cause startle (i.e., HSR), it’s not clear whether annoyance reaction is more like aircraft than rail.  Ruth Mazer and I gave a presentation at TRB comparing aviation and HSR in the Boston-New York Acela corridor, using both the FRA methodology and the FAA’s Integrated Noise Model.  We estimated that the number of people exposed to Sound Exposure Levels (SELs) from aircraft flying BOS-NYC high enough to cause speech disturbance (85 dB) ranges from 1,000 to 1,500 (depending on runway, flight path, aircraft type, and airport); whereas the number of people exposed to the same level on the BOS-NYC route is 12,000.  On the other hand, there are close to 30 shuttle flights per day in each direction and only 10 trainsets.  Is it better to expose the same 1,000 people to excessive noise 60 times per day or twelve times as many people only 20 times per day? 
Source: EU Position Paper On Dose Response Relationships Between Transportation Noise And Annoyance, 2002

Source: EU Position Paper On Dose Response Relationships Between Transportation Noise And Annoyance, 2002: http://ec.europa.eu/environment/noise/pdf/noise_expert_network.pdf

  • Air Quality:  Mikhail Chester from UC Berkeley also gave a presentation at TRB entitled, “Life-Cycle Assessment of High Speed Rail:  Total Environmental Accounting”, in which he compared the total air quality outputs from automobiles, aviation, and HSR.  LCA includes not just the operation and maintenance of the vehicles, but the infrastructure development and energy production.  Two interesting figures are presented below, which demonstrate that although emissions per passenger kilometer traveled (PKT) is highly dependent on vehicle loading, HSR consistently produces less CO2 than aviation only when it is assumed that the HSR uses “clean” fuel, and is not a clear “winner” over aviation when comparing NOx.  More detail on Mikhail’s research is here.
Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Source: Mikhail Chester, 2011

Lifecycle NOx Emissions, Source: Mikhail Chester, 2011

 

Lifecycle NOx Emissions, Source: Mikhail Chester, 2011

Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Source: Mikhail Chester, 2011

I look forward to your responses, and to seeing some real data – especially noise – on this subject.

Report from TRB 2010 Annual Meeting

Wednesday, January 27th, 2010

by Mary Ellen Eagan

At long last, a report from the 2010 Annual TRB Conference.  My focus is on the workshop, committee meetings, and sessions that were sponsored or co-sponsored by the Committee on the Environmental Impacts of Aviation (AV030).  Here’s my three days at TRB, in chronological order:

Sunday’s Workshop The Costs of Cleaner: Aviation’s Emissions Inventories and Economic Consequences of Their Reduction included three presentations with very different lenses on the climate change issue:

The Committee on Environmental Impacts of Aviation (AV030) held its meeting Monday morning (yours truly presiding – please let me know if you’re interested in joining our mailing list).  In addition to discussion of committee business, there were two student paper presentations:  Analysis and Control of Airport Departure Processes to Mitigate Congestion Impacts by Ioannis Simaiakis of Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Lung Deposition of Jet Engine Exhaust Particulate Matter by Elizabeth A. Black of Missouri University of Science and Technology.  The Sustainability Subcommittee also met on Monday, and included a third paper presentation, Mitigating Aviation Carbon Dioxide Emissions: An Analysis for Europe by Lynnette Dray of the University of Cambridge.  The Noise Subcommittee meeting (a joint subcommittee with the Committee on Transportation Noise, ADC40) included presentations by Raquel Girvin on Noise Effects Characterization and Mitigation Research and Lynn Engelman on the DOD Aviation Noise Program.  We also announced the formation of a new Water Resources Subcommittee, which will be ably led by Thomas Klin of CH2M Hill.

AV030 sponsored or co-sponsored three technical sessions:

As you can probably infer from this recitation of meetings and papers, attending TRB’s annual meeting can be a bit like drinking from a fire hose.  My advice to newcomers is pacing (those 9 pm sessions can really do you in), but I have always found the sessions to be informative and stimulating.  And I usually find that something about one (or more) of the sessions finally sinks in sometime later.  I’ll check back in then.

Complacency

Wednesday, January 20th, 2010

by Mary Ellen Eagan

Ted Kennedy is rolling in his grave.

I will do my very best to not make this a political post (although my political views are rather transparent).  Over the last couple of days, I’ve mostly been thinking about complacency and arrogance.  And a fair amount about marketing.  I’ve been thinking about how they apply to our industry, our public process, and the importance of communication.

A colleague in China commented on the latest obstruction to the Cape Wind project by stating that it’s a whole lot easier to get things built there; i.e., the American consultative model (NEPA) is an impediment to progress.  As consultants, we sometimes struggle to find value in public meetings, and I have certainly seen the process dismissed as meaningless (but I’ve blogged about this before).  I’m hoping yesterday’s election is a reminder to us all that it’s not necessarily the smartest, most logical, or fairest person/idea/project that succeeds in this democracy.  It’s the one that has meaning for people.  And each vote counts the same.

I promise to get to TRB soon. 

A Long Week

Friday, January 15th, 2010

by Mary Ellen Eagan

I’m supposed to be blogging about TRB’s Annual Meeting, and the exciting and informative workshops, committee meetings, and sessions I attended.

Instead, I find myself contemplating the situation in Haiti.  I’m thinking not just about the logistical and operational challenge of operating an airport that has been decimated, but mostly about the collapse of an entire country – one analogy I read was that it’s as if everyone in New Orleans had drowned in Katrina.  I’m also thinking about the poverty, colonialism, and neglect that are the real causes of this tragedy and struggling with what the US should (and can) do about it.

So I will return to TRB after the weekend.  In the interim, if you’re interested in contributing, please consider Partners in Health, a physician-led organization that has been on the ground in Haiti for more than 20 years.